Adversarial map coloring

This Riddler problem considers the classical map-coloring problem with an adversarial twist! One player draws countries and the other player colors them.

Allison and Bob decide to play a map-coloring game. Each turn, Allison draws a simple closed curve on a piece of paper, and Bob must then color the interior of the “country” that curve creates with one of his many crayons. If the new country borders any pre-existing countries, Bob must color the new country with a color that is different from the ones he used for the bordering ones.

Allison wins the game when she forces Bob to use a sixth color. If they both play optimally, how many countries will Allison have to draw to win?

Here is my solution:
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Pokémon Go Efficiency

This Riddler puzzle is about a topic near and dear to many hearts: Pokémon!

Your neighborhood park is full of Pokéstops — places where you can restock on Pokéballs to, yes, catch more Pokémon! You are at one of them right now and want to visit them all. The Pokéstops are located at points whose (x, y) coordinates are integers on a fixed coordinate system in the park.

For any given pair of Pokéstops in your park, it is possible to walk from one to the other along a path that always goes from one Pokéstop to another Pokéstop adjacent to it. (Two Pokéstops are considered adjacent if they are at points that are exactly 1 unit apart. For example, Pokéstops at (3, 4) and (4, 4) would be considered adjacent.)

You’re an ambitious and efficient Pokémon trainer, who is also a bit of a homebody: You wish to visit each Pokéstop and return to where you started, while traveling the shortest possible total distance. In this open park, it is possible to walk in a straight line from any point to any other point — you’re not confined to the coordinate system’s grid. It turns out that this is a really hard problem, so you seek an approximate solution.

If there are N Pokéstops in total, find the upper and lower bounds on the total length of the optimal walk. (Your objective is to find bounds whose ratio is as close to 1 as possible.)

Advanced extra credit: For solvers who prefer a numerical question with this theme, suppose that the Pokéstops are located at every point with coordinates (x, y), where x and y are relatively prime positive integers less than or equal to 1,000. Find upper and lower bounds for the length of the optimal walk, again seeking bounds whose ratio is as close to 1 as possible.

The problem of visiting a set of locations while minimizing total distance traveled is known as a Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP), and it is indeed a famous and notoriously difficult problem in computer science. That being said, bounding the solution to a particular TSP instance can be easy if we take advantage of its structure.

Here is my solution to the first part:
[Show Solution]

Here is my solution to the second part:
[Show Solution]